Norway’s memorial

22 July 2011, Oslo

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The same day, Utoya Island, Norway

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27 February, 2014, Oslo.

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Three years ago 69 people, many of them young, were murdered in Oslo and on Utoya, an island in Norway.

A contest was held this past winter for two memorials, one in each location. The judges chose Jonas Dahlberg, because his proposal “takes the emptiness and traces of the tragic events of 22 July as its starting point” and then makes a dramatic break in a landscape, a sudden cutting away of the headland, where the names of the dead are inscribed on an inaccessible rock face, separated from the viewer by water.

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From the press release (27/02/2014) of KORO/Public Art Norway:

Dahlberg’s concept takes the site at Sørbråten as its point of departure. Here he proposes a wound or a cut within the landscape itself to recreate the physical experience of something being taken away, and to reflect the abrupt and permanent loss of those who died on Utøya. The cut will be a three-and-a-half-metre wide excavation running from the top of the headland at the Sørbråten site to below the waterline and extending to each side. This gap in the landscape will make it impossible to reach the end of the headland.

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The Jury considers Dahlberg’s proposal for Sørbråten as artistically highly original and interesting. It is capable of conveying and confronting the trauma and loss that the 22 July events resulted in in a daring way. The proposal is radical and brave, and evokes the tragic events in a physical and direct manner.

The material excavated from the cut at Sørbråten will be used to build the foundation for the temporary memorial at the Government Quarter in Oslo, and will also subsequently serve as the foundation for the permanent memorial there.

Here are the other entries for the July 22 memorials: http://minnesteder.no/en/entries/

if Banksy says its good…

does it have to be stamped “Banksy approved”? No, but it doesn’t hurt that the artist has posted an image by a Vancouver artist who goes by I ♡ The Street Art, as reported in VanCity Buzz.

At the time of publication, within two hours after it was posted on Banksy’s Facebook page with #NotBanksy as its description, the photo has already been liked by more than 60,000 people and shared nearly 7,000 times.

"Nobody Likes You" (2014) by I Heart the Street Art

“Nobody Likes You” (2014) by I Heart the Street Art

And he’s selling prints of this from his website. The artist writes he “froze my arse off” while making this work in Calgary in minus 20 Celsius weather:

by I Heart the Street Art

by I Heart the Street Art

img_15311img_1687One could argue that this is a rip-0ff of the Banksy style, but that would be more like an homage to him in graffiti circles, and don’t all artists build on, use elements of, and otherwise riff on other artists?

Video profile by Chris Bentzen for Hot Art Wet City

https://vimeo.com/83263130

Kaarina Kaikkonen

Although shot a couple of years ago, this video hasn’t been available online until now. Kaarina is from Finland. She creates art from found and recycled objects, often men’s shirts, which reflect a dark moment in her childhood when she witnessed her father’s sudden death, and her guilt over not being able to save him. She has exhibited at the Venice Biennale, the Museum of Memory and Human Rights (Chile), Cuba, the U.S., England and elsewhere.

Kaarina Kaikkonen: The Blue Route, 2013. Courtesy of Fabrica Gallery, Brighton.

Kaarina Kaikkonen: The Blue Route, 2013. Courtesy of Fabrica Gallery, Brighton.

In Vancouver she created a temporary installation at the Van Dusen Botanical Garden for the Vancouver Biennale 2009-2011, where I caught up with her as she worked with volunteers to build her sculpture.

New waterfront installation

Janet Echelman will install a temporary artwork over the sidewalk and water at the Trade and Convention Centre in Vancouver for the 2014 TED talks this March.

Studio Echelman is currently working on designs for a monumental aerial sculpture to premiere at the TED Conference’s 30th anniversary in Vancouver, March 2014. The sculpture will suspend 700 feet between a 30-story skyscraper and the Vancouver Convention Center– challenging the artist to work on her most ambitious scale yet. –http://www.echelman.com/project/ted-2014-conference-sculpture/

The location. Trade and Convention Centre has second largest green roof in North America. Sculpture will be on far side of building.

The location. Trade and Convention Centre has second largest green roof in North America. Sculpture will be on far side of building.

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This work will only be up for one month. I’ll video the installation and put it up here.

Her previous work in this area was for the Olympic Speed Skating Oval in Richmond BC, which is a permanent installation: Water Sky Garden.

Janet Echelman: Water Sky Garden (2010)

Janet Echelman: Water Sky Garden (2010)

Water Sky Garden, photo © Christina Lazar-Schuler

Water Sky Garden, photo © Christina Lazar-Schuler

Please take the time to view Janet Echelman’s TED talk: Taking Imagination Seriously, as it is truly inspiring…

 

adbusting guerilla public art

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Artist Daniel Soares printed up some Photoshop toolbars and stuck them onto H&M billboards. We’re getting more of this kickback against the image adjustments of women in advertising, including YouTube videos such as this:

freeway overpass transformed

In San Antonio, Texas, artists Joe O’Connell and Blessing Hancock created globe-shaped chandeliers from bike parts, suspended them from a freeway overpass (underpass if you’re a cyclist!), to create an inviting, safer space which can be used not only as a through-path but as a location for events.

From the artists’ web page, a description of Ballroom Luminoso (2013):

Dimensions:
(6) 48″ diameter

Materials:
recycled bicycle parts, structural steel, custom LED fixtures and controller

Location:
Theo & Malone Underpass at IH 35, San Antonio, Texas

Commissioning Agency:
Public Art San Antonio (PASA), Department for Culture and Creative Development

Ballroom Luminoso is a series of six brilliantly lit, color changing chandeliers. Drawing from the formal elegance of the freeway underpass and the cultural currents of the surrounding neighborhoods, the piece transforms a forgotten space into one that connects the community.

Each globe contains a custom-designed LED light fixture, which casts sharply detailed shadows. The chandeliers paint the underpass with complex color patterns and ethereal lighting refashioning the space into a majestic ballroom-cum-shadow theater. Melding grandeur with a sense of neighborhood rejuvenation, the sculptures weld recycled bike parts into refined forms.

Ballroom Luminoso references the area’s past, present, and future in the design of its intricately detailed medallions. The images in the medallions draw on the community’s agricultural history, strong Hispanic heritage, and burgeoning environmental movement. The medallions are a play on the iconography of La Loteria, which has become a touchstone of Hispanic culture.

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Read more at either TreeHugger or at the artist’s public art page, JB Public Art.

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New Rules for Public Art

Heather & Ivan Morison, Journée des Barricades, Wellington, 2008. Photo: Steven Rowe, published in Public Art Now.

Heather & Ivan Morison, Journée des Barricades, Wellington, 2008. Photo: Steven Rowe, published in Public Art Now.

The European blog Public Art Now reports on a manifesto from Bristol. Situations.org, which “produces both temporary and long-term public artworks, as well as acting as a connector to bring people and partners together through collective programmes and festival events in the South West of England and internationally,” created this manifesto, which you can purchase as a small booklet, or download as poster.

 

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Rule no. 01

IT DOESN’T HAVE TO LOOK LIKE PUBLIC ART.

Futurefarmers, Flatbread Society, Oslo, 2013. Photo: Max McClure. Courtesy, Public Art Now.

Futurefarmers, Flatbread Society, Oslo, 2013. Photo: Max McClure. From Public Art Now.

Rule no. 05

WITHDRAW FROM THE CULTURAL ARMS RACE.

Towns and cities across the world are locked into a one-size fits all style of public art. In a culture of globalized brands and clone towns, we hanker after authentic, distinctive places. If we are place-making, then let’s make unusual places.

Josephin Böttger, Surrey Urban Screen, Surrey BC. September 6 to 15, 2013

Josephin Böttger, Surrey Urban Screen, Surrey BC.
September 6 to 15, 2013

There are ten more at http://publicartnow.com/2013/12/12/the-new-rules-of-public-art/ and if you subscribe to their email list you’ll get a download link for a poster of the new rules.

Rule no. 10

DON’T WASTE TIME ON DEFINITIONS.

Is it sculpture? Is it visual art? Is it performance? Who cares! There are more important questions to ask. Does it move you? Does it shake up your perceptions of the world around you, or your backyard? Do you want to tell someone else about it? Does it make you curious to see more?

Jeppe Hein, Follow Me, Bristol, 2009. Photo: Jamie Woodley­. Courtesy University of Bristol

Jeppe Hein, Follow Me, Bristol, 2009. Photo: Jamie Woodley­. Courtesy University of Bristol